Stop cruel experiments on beagles

Beagles are being force fed pesticides

A guest blog by Jennifer Wingo

Editor’s note: Jennifer Wingo reports that the experiment reported on here has been shut down and 36 laboratory beagles are up for adoption.

Gentle beagles are being bred for torture by companies like Marshall BioResource. Laboratories in Michigan and other parts of the United States then use these healthy beagles for experiments.

Specifically, the Dow AgroSciences, Paredox Therapeutics, and Above and Beyond NB LLC, at the Charles River Laboratories in Mattawan, Michigan are force feeding healthy dogs pesticides as part of a year-long experiment.

Then they euthanize the dogs to test their organs.

These companies are destroying a loving sensitive animal that could easily have had a healthy life for 13-16 years. These laboratory dogs don’t ever get to play in the grass or smell the outdoors.

Though they are genetically programmed to love humans and be loved in return, they receive no positive human interaction.

Beagles are social dogs with big personalities and giant hearts. They are exceptional companions because of their sweet dispositions, protective instincts and ability to adapt to many environments.

They are more than just hunters, they are playful and love being part of a family. Beagles are gentle, smart, happy-go-lucky, but sensitive creatures. They love to run in the grass, chase and play.

I have owned beagles for many years and love the breed dearly. They require a lot of attention, but provide so much love, entertainment and general companionship to a home.

Please help beagles by signing this petition.

Nicotine studies should be done on humans

By Lynn Hamilton

I applaud the United States Food and Drug Administration for its decision to close down a study that killed four monkeys.

Since 2014, the National Center for Toxicological Research has been conducting a study on the affects of nicotine on squirrel monkeys. That study has now been shut down, after pressure from Jane Goodall and animal rights organizations.

Nicotine studies should be conducted on paid, human volunteers, preferably those who are already smokers. Studying small animals to an effort to understand how various chemicals affect humans is not efficient.

I think we all knew that nicotine kills people. And now we know it kills monkeys. Have we actually learned anything new here?

We already know that nicotine is addictive, and we already know that it is a powerful addiction, one that is difficult to overcome.

For further, more refined knowledge on the exact effects of nicotine use, human volunteers should be recruited exclusively. The problem with using monkeys is that:

  1. Monkeys don’t smoke voluntarily outside labs. Humans do.
  2. Monkeys didn’t volunteer to be part of a dangerous experiment. Humans will volunteer for dangerous experiments if well paid.
  3. Monkeys are in no way paid or rewarded for such experiments. Humans will, reasonably enough, demand to be paid.
  4. Subjecting an innocent animal to a substance already known to cause death is morally irresponsible.