Where do service animals pee on a Delta flight?

Delta Airlines have said they will cut back on the rights of passengers to bring comfort animals aboard. The new, proposed rules say that, in effect, only dogs and cats may be brought on board, and passengers will have to give notice 48 hours in advance, if they wish to bring a comfort animal on a flight.

Delta representatives are saying that comfort animals wander the cabin and urinate or defecate in inappropriate spaces in the cabin. Once, a comfort animal bit a fellow passenger.

Animal Rights Channel supports the rights of dogs to serve as therapy and service animals because dogs often seek out and enjoy work, just as humans do. We believe that helping others less fortunate gives meaning to life for both humans and animals. Similarly, we believe that most cats have a strong drive to snuggle with humans, a situation that provides mutual comfort and emotional support to both human and cat. Therefore, many cats are predisposed to be excellent comfort animals as well, and they are unlikely to regard this as work.

It is, however, questionable whether ducks, snakes, and other smaller brained animals should be subjected to air travel. The stress of such travel could be damaging to the animal, and small comfort to the human.

In complaining about service animals, Delta representatives have said nothing about whether they supply a place for service animals to urinate and defecate. Flights are often delayed, as we all know, and even well-trained animals can only hold on to their body waste for so long. AnimalRightsChannel.com has put in a request for information from Delta’s communications department to answer this question.

 

 

Norway thinks we’re the shithole

waters-3022419_960_720.jpgLet’s take a look at whether Norwegians would actually like to immigrate to the United States. By all usual measures, especially education, healthcare, and the prison system, it appears Norwegians have a higher standard of living than we do.

A little research into Norway’s animal welfare code shows that Norwegians are way ahead of us in animal rights. Norwegians are compelled by law to report or aid an animal in distress. Here’s a quote from the code: “Anybody who discovers an animal which is obviously sick, injured, or helpless, shall as far as possible help the animal. If it is impossible to provide adequate help, and the animal is domestic or a large wild mammal, the owner, or the police shall be alerted immediately.”

When I met my dog, Alice, she was dying of combined malnutrition and exhaustion in my back yard, and my neighbor, Kenny, was stabbing her with a broom stick.

“Kenny, what are you doing?” my husband asked.

“This dog has mange,” Kenny said, while he continued to assault her.

“But she’s on our side of the fence,” my husband said.

Finally, we got Kenny to desist. But then we had to do something. U.S. law apparently says we can allow her to turn into compost. But that kind of chafes at our personal standards. We called animal control and were told that they won’t collect a suffering animal “unless it bites someone.”

Long story short: Somewhere on the way to the vet’s office, my husband fell in love with this dog that had half her fur. She’s long recovered and snuggling on our bed, as I write this. We named her Alice.

But when I look at the infrastructure for animal welfare in my country, I’m forced to ask, under my breath, “Am I living in a shithole country?” And why would any Norwegian want to come here?

 

Dogs can do a lot more than roll in the grass, so don’t use pesticides

We all know that dogs can do things humans can’t. Like track down murderers from a single whiff of their shirt. And, if you watch cop shows, you probably know that dogs can detect drug shipments and guns.

If you rely on one or more dogs to keep your home safe while you’re away, you’re smart. Dogs are still the best security system. Most burglars are simply looking for an easy target, and that big barking dog with her paws on the door just made your house not worth it.

You might know that dogs can be trained to predict seizures in epileptic children and adults, saving lives. But did you know that dogs can be trained to detect bedbugs?

Sadly enough, dogs can predict when an industrial environment is toxic to humans. When dogs start getting lymphoma, there’s a chance to save the humans in the same neighborhood. You see, dogs will develop cancer in response to toxins much more quickly than we will.

Dogs truly are man’s best friend in many ways. But if you have a dog, you have a responsibility to maintain an organic lawn. The chemicals in lawn pesticides have been linked to cancer in dogs and possibly humans.

Today’s action calls for dog owners to go organic on their own property and talk with your dog-owning neighbors about the dangers of lawn chemicals.

Dogs facts and information – Dogs can do a lot more than roll in the grass, so don’t use pesticides

We all know that dogs can do things humans can’t. Like track down murderers from a single whiff of their shirt. And, if you watch cop shows, you probably know that dogs can detect drug shipments and guns.

If you rely on one or more dogs to keep your home safe while you’re away, you’re smart. Dogs are still the best security system. Most burglars are simply looking for an easy target, and that big barking dog with her paws on the door just made your house not worth it.

You might know that dogs can be trained to predict seizures in epileptic children and adults, saving lives. But did you know that dogs can be trained to detect bedbugs?

Sadly enough, dogs can predict when an industrial environment is toxic to humans. When dogs start getting lymphoma, there’s a chance to save the humans in the same neighborhood. You see, dogs will develop cancer in response to toxins much more quickly than we will.

Dogs truly are man’s best friend in many ways. But if you have a dog, you have a responsibility to maintain an organic lawn. The chemicals in lawn pesticides have been linked to cancer in dogs and possibly humans.

Today’s action calls for dog owners to go organic on their own property and talk with your dog-owning neighbors about the dangers of lawn chemicals.

How different are dogs and foxes?

By Judith Sansregret

We know that all dogs, even chatty little lap sitters like the Pekingese, are descended from wolves. And all dogs, from the dignified mastiff to the Pomeranian, share such similar genetics, you couldn’t tell them apart from their DNA strings.

But the fox looks like a dog! Except for malamutes and huskies, most dogs look more like foxes than they look like wolves.

So I decided to do a little research. I soon discovered a Russian experiment on domestication of silver foxes that began in the 1950s and is still running.animal-1248899__340

No right-thinking animal rights advocate could possibly support this experiment. The experiment is currently funded by the sale of tame foxes and fox fur. However, the results suggest something interesting: foxes could just as easily have become man’s best friend.

At the beginning, foxes in this experiment were bred for not biting the researchers and not fleeing the researchers. Eventually, they were bred for allowing themselves to be petted and fed by hand. As they were bred for tameness, their physiques changed. They got floppier ears, curlier tails, and some of them sported spots on their fur.

Though they were not bred for cuteness, they acquired dog-like cuteness as they got tamer.

Within just ten generations, twenty percent of the foxes in the experiment acted just like dogs. They wagged their tales, approached people they didn’t know without fear, and interacted joyfully with humans, preferring their company to that of other foxes. A recent article on this experiment shows a fox sleeping on the lap of a human.

It appears that foxes could have become dogs about as easily as wolves did. So it may be just a quirk of history that dogs were bred from wolves.

So there is your answer: any fox might be only ten generations away from being a dog.

Britain admits animals feel pain

Great Britain’s Michael Gove has admitted that animals can feel pain and “enshrined” that into law, according to all major UK news vehicles.

Gove, the UK’s environment secretary, has been widely photographed with a white fluffy dog in his arms.

This happened because animal rights advocates got a whiff that British Parliament was getting ready to jettison a European Union law that recognizes animal sentience.

Admittedly, the European Union law is foundational for preventing animal cruelty, but it does almost nothing to protect wild animals from loss of habitat.

Nevertheless, animal rights champions should support the new bill while continuing to ask for more stringent protections of animals.

What you can do

Read the bill here:  https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/666576/draft-animal-welfare-bill-171212.pdf

Write to the team who are taking public comment on this issue. Here is the snail mail address:

Animal Welfare Team, Area 5B, Nobel House, 17 Smith Square, London, SW1P 3JR

If you live in the UK, please take this survey to support the Animal Welfare Bill:  2018:https://consult.defra.gov.uk/animal-health-and-welfare/consultation-on-the-animal-welfare-bill/